Showing all 11 results

  • bhut jolokia, ghost pepper, Backyard Eden, www.backyard-eden.com

    Bhut Jolokia

    100-120 days from transplant—Also known as Ghost Pepper, Naga Morich. Legendary variety, one of the world’s hottest peppers, with readings in excess of 1,000,000 Scoville units! Bhut Jolokia starts out slow but eventually makes tall plants, exceeding 4 ft in favored locations. The thin-walled, wrinkled, pointed fruits reach 2-3″ in length, ripening mostly to red.  10 seeds.

    PLANTING:

    Indoors- 12 weeks before last frost, 1/4” deep with soil temperatures 75 degrees. Liquid fertilize seedlings every 7-10 days. Transplant out 24” apart after last frost when soil is 55-60 degrees and night temperatures are over 45 degrees.

    Harvest- When fruit is red (or color of the variety planted) and firm.

    Tips- Plant in fertile soil, amended with compost, mulch and provide even moisture. Apply a light compost tea every few weeks. Do not apply excessive nitrogen, which can promote excessive foliage and poor fruit set.

     

    not rated $3.00
  • Brazilian Starfish

    Unique, star-shaped fruits are of variable heat, sometimes exceeding that of jalapenos, yet juicy and often quite sweet. (Carefully removing the seeds eliminates most of the heat as well.) Curious-looking fruits reach 2″ in width, ripening to brilliant red at maturity. Plants are vigorous and unusual, having an almost weeping, vine-like habit. Slow to yield but, by the end of the season, amazingly prolific. The species originated in Peru, but this variety was domesticated in Brazil.  10 Seeds.

    PLANTING:

    Indoors- 12 weeks before last frost, 1/4” deep with soil temperatures 75 degrees. Liquid fertilize seedlings every 7-10 days. Transplant out 24” apart after last frost when soil is 55-60 degrees and night temperatures are over 45 degrees.

    Harvest- When fruit is red (or color of the variety planted) and firm.
    Tips- Plant in fertile soil, amended with compost, mulch and provide even moisture. Apply a light compost tea every few weeks. Do not apply excessive nitrogen, which can promote excessive foliage and poor fruit set.

    not rated $2.50
  • Caribbean Red Habanero

    For those who like it hot! These can be twice as spicy as the common orange habanero, so use caution as you enjoy the incredible warmth and rich, smoky-citrus taste of these lantern-shaped 2” fruit. Very ornamental, as well as perfect for spicing up a pot of chili or making killer hot sauce. A heavy producer, so you will have plenty of extras for farmers market. 10 Seeds.

    PLANTING:

    Indoors- 12 weeks before last frost, 1/4” deep with soil temperatures 75 degrees. Liquid fertilize seedlings every 7-10 days. Transplant out 24” apart after last frost when soil is 55-60 degrees and night temperatures are over 45 degrees.

    Harvest- When fruit is red (or color of the variety planted) and firm.

    Tips- Plant in fertile soil, amended with compost, mulch and provide even moisture. Apply a light compost tea every few weeks. Do not apply excessive nitrogen, which can promote excessive foliage and poor fruit set.

    not rated $2.50
  • Sale!
    Cherokee Purple Tomato, Backyard Eden, www.backyard-eden.com

    Cherokee Purple Tomato

    HEIRLOOM – 19th Century Indeterminate. Many heirloom tomatoes get the accolade “best tasting” from their fans, and this is certainly one of them. Originally grown in Tennessee by Native Americans of the Cherokee tribe the 6 inch, 12 to 16 ounce fruit come in shades of dusty rose to purple, sometimes with greenish shoulders. While it is a beefsteak type, it is known for its sweet aftertaste –almost like candy–with heavy yields. 25 seeds.

    PLANTING:

    Indoors- 6 weeks before last frost, 1/4” deep with soil temperatures 75 degrees. Liquid fertilize seedlings every 7-10 days. Transplant out 24-36” apart after last frost when soil is 55-60 degrees and night temperatures are over 45 degrees.

    Harvest- When fruit is red (or color of the variety planted) and firm.

    Tips- Plant in fertile soil, amended with compost, mulch and provide even moisture. Plant deeper than they were growing in the containers as it makes a stronger roots system. Apply a light compost tea every few weeks. Do not apply excessive nitrogen, which can promote excessive foliage and poor fruit set.

    not rated $1.50 $0.99
  • Jalapeno M

     

    The Jalapeno M matures in 70 to 75 days. Sausage-shaped fruits average 3.5″ x 1.5″ and are very pungent dark green fruits that are slow to turn red.  Upright dark green plants grow from 26″ to 36″ tall and will continue producing over an extended period of time, making this an excellent choice for the home garden! A very popular seasoning in Mexican and American cuisine! Great for raw or pickled eating. 25 Seeds.

    PLANTING:

    Indoors- 10 weeks before last frost, 1/4” deep with soil temperatures 75 degrees. Liquid fertilize seedlings every 7-10 days. Transplant out 24” apart after last frost when soil is 55-60 degrees and night temperatures are over 45 degrees.

    Harvest- When fruit is red but can be harvested when green.

    Tips- Plant in fertile soil, amended with compost, mulch and provide even moisture. Apply a light compost tea every few weeks. Do not apply excessive nitrogen, which can promote excessive foliage and poor fruit set.

    not rated $0.99
  • Lemon Drop

    (C. chinense) 100 days. Seasoning pepper from Peru ripens to a clear lemon yellow, sometimes with a dark purple blush. The flavor is a very clean, uncomplicated, slightly citrus like heat. 2-foot plants are covered with the thin-walled, conical fruits which reach 2-3 inches in length, with very few seeds.  10 Seeds.

    PLANTING:

    Indoors- 12 weeks before last frost, 1/4” deep with soil temperatures 75 degrees. Liquid fertilize seedlings every 7-10 days. Transplant out 24” apart after last frost when soil is 55-60 degrees and night temperatures are over 45 degrees.

    Harvest- When fruit is red (or color of the variety planted) and firm.

    Tips- Plant in fertile soil, amended with compost, mulch and provide even moisture. Apply a light compost tea every few weeks. Do not apply excessive nitrogen, which can promote excessive foliage and poor fruit set.

    not rated $2.00
  • Sale!

    Luffa Seeds

    The sponge gourd or luffa gourd is not at all well utilized in North America. In Asia, luffas are seriously appreciated vegetables that are very easy to grow and do especially well in hot, humid, or even hot dry climates(with irrigation).

    This variety Sujara is a one of those special vegetable type luffas; it is harvested while still green and tender. (This has more to do with maturity than size, as tender ones can still be 12 inches long!) This vegetable is used as one would use zucchini, chayote, or other thick green vegetables. They are great in all Italian dishes and they are extremely disease-resistant plants.

    If you have trouble growing zucchinis because of heat and pests, consider growing some luffa vegetables they are delicious. They do particularly well in areas with a long growing season. The vines are happy to climb on old fences, old sheds and even houses!

    Contains 25 seeds

    not rated $3.00 $1.50
  • Sale!

    Minnesota Midget Melon

    Germ 4-10 days

    Minnesota Midget Melon features compact 3’ vines that produce a quantity of 4” cantaloupes which mature very early. Has an excellent sweet flavor. 20 seeds

    PLANTING:

    Indoors- Individual biodegradable peat/cowpots 1/2” deep, 3-4 weeks before last frost with soil temperature 70 degrees. Transplant 36” apart after last frost without disturbing the roots.

    Outdoors- 1/2” deep after last frost in warm soil at least 70 degrees.

    Harvest- Look for the following signs as it does take some practice on telling when they are ready to harvest. The skin tone changes and netting becomes heavy, the ends soften, they will slip from the vines or a gentle tug will pull it away from the vine, a crack develops around the stem, the closet tendril to the stem dries, and the aroma increases when ripening.

    Tips- Plant in fertile soil amended with compost or well rotted manure and keep well watered. They benefit from growing on black plastic and by using row covers for weed, insect control, and more rapid growth.

    not rated $1.50 $0.99
  • Sale!
    National Pickling Cucumber, Backyard Eden, www.backyard-eden.com

    National Pickling Cucumber

    The old standby that still provides a nice combination of earliness and abundant yields. Fruit can be used at any size, growing to be 5 1/2 inches long, 2 1/2 inches wide, and a dark mottled green. Vines are rambling and prolific. 25 seeds.

    Indoors- Individual biodegradable peat/cowpots 1/2” deep, 3-4 weeks before last frost with soil temperature 70 degrees. Transplant after last frost without disturbing the roots

    Outdoors- 1/2” deep after last frost in warm soil at least 70 degrees

    Harvest- Pick daily to keep the harvest flowing.

    Tips- Plant in fertile soil amended with compost. Mulch and keep well watered. Trellising the vines allows for good air circulation and takes less space than hills and provides shade for heat sensitive crops like lettuce.

    not rated $1.50 $0.99
  • Pasilla Bajio

    80 days. Mild-sweet-hot, fruit is dark green, turning brown as it ripens. This pepper is used in Mexican “mole” sauces; tasty.  These are always one of the first to produce here on our farm. 15 seeds.

    PLANTING:

    Indoors- 12 weeks before last frost, 1/4” deep with soil temperatures 75 degrees. Liquid fertilize seedlings every 7-10 days. Transplant out 24” apart after last frost when soil is 55-60 degrees and night temperatures are over 45 degrees.

    Harvest- When fruit is red (or color of the variety planted) and firm.

    Tips- Plant in fertile soil, amended with compost, mulch and provide even moisture. Apply a light compost tea every few weeks. Do not apply excessive nitrogen, which can promote excessive foliage and poor fruit set.

    not rated $2.00
  • Santa Fe Grande

    Spicy, 4” peppers, glowing gold in color and quite warm; makes pretty pickles and salsa. Ornamental plants give heavy yields over the entire summer, making this a perfect choice for home or market gardens. Introduced in 1965.  15 Seeds.

    PLANTING:

    Indoors- 12 weeks before last frost, 1/4” deep with soil temperatures 75 degrees. Liquid fertilize seedlings every 7-10 days. Transplant out 24” apart after last frost when soil is 55-60 degrees and night temperatures are over 45 degrees.

    Harvest- When fruit is red (or color of the variety planted) and firm.

    Tips- Plant in fertile soil, amended with compost, mulch and provide even moisture. Apply a light compost tea every few weeks. Do not apply excessive nitrogen, which can promote excessive foliage and poor fruit set.

    not rated $2.00